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Datacenter Flood Safety

 

Summary of Datacenter Flood Risk Profile

Engineering Makes Area Extremely Safe

  • Prior to 2006, Pay Per Cloud’s Natomas location was outside zone X (200 year flood plain)
  • Since 1917, when the modern levee system was created, Natomas has not flooded. In fact, the area was unaffected by the 1986 and 1997 historical events.
  • In 2005, Hurricane Katrina and the associated storm surges caused under-seepage failures in New Orleans.
  • To raise money for levee improvements, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and FEMA, reevaluated all levee standards across the nation. As a result, the Natomas levees were de-rated to account for the new standard. This new standard was based on the potential for under-seepage risk, which has never been proven to occur in the Sacramento Area.
  • Protected Bonds were issued in the amount of $4.89B to improve the Sacramento Levee system including 618M to improve the Natomas Levees. These were the first bonds issued in the U.S. and is the first project scheduled for completion.
  • The Natomas levees improvement program is substantively completed.
  • FEMA is expected to re-rate the Natomas levees during the fourth Quarter of 2011.

 

Natomas Area Not Affected

Natomas Area Simply Not Affected by Historic Flood Events

  • Levees and weirs were constructed under the Sacramento River Flood Control Project (SRFCP) authorized by congress in 1917.
  • Folsom Dam was completed in 1956 and designed to have 500-year flood protection.
  • 1964 record flood causes US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to re-assess Folsom Dam with 120-year flood protection.
  • 1986 record flood 10 inches of rain in 11 days. USACE conclude that SRFCP deficiencies render it vulnerable to 70-year flood.
  • 1997 fifth record flood in 46 years and highlighted potential for levee under-seepage. USACE change levee standard to include deep seepage cutoff walls adopted in 1999.
  • Natomas has not flooded since SRFCP was instituted in 1917.

 

Protection by Levees

Levees Designed to Intentionally Drain Away From the Natomas Area and Into the Adjacent Farm Lands

  • Currently Natomas is protected by a series of levees and weirs (small dams). Lands.Natomas Area Flood Control
  • Levees and weirs were constructed under the Sacramento River Flood Control Project (SRFCP) authorized by congress in 1917.
  • Following the flood in 1986 and conclusion that SRFCP deficiencies rendered Sacramento vulnerable to 70-year flood, SAFCA formed. SAFCA and USACE completed several projects in 1996 that they conclude provide Natomas with 200-year flood protection along the American River and 140-year flood protection along the Sacramento River.

 

Current Flood Control

Current Natomas Area Flood Control

  • 1997 fifth record flood in 46 years and highlighted potential for levee under-seepage. USACE change levee standard to include deep seepage cutoff walls adopted in 1999.
  • USACE Levee Seepage Task Force convened in 2003 and developed new standard design guidance.
  • Design guidance now includes slurry wall to prevent seepage, 3 feet of freeboard from 200-year event and improved levee wall gradients.
  • In July 2006, SAFCA issues Natomas Levee Evaluation Study based on revised standard design guidance and lesson learned from 1997. USACE endorses report to FEMA in July.
  • On December 29, 2006 FEMA issues notice to Sacramento of map revision for Natomas Basin by April 2007 to be effective in November 2007 based on revised standard design guidance and SAFCA and USACE studies.

 

Further Improvements Funded

2006 Prop 1E and 84

  • CA Voters approved $4.89 billion in bond funding in November 2006 for flood control.
  • Design is to give Natomas 200-year flood protection up to date with new changes in federal levee design criteria by 2010.
  • Changes include Folsom Dam modifications and improvements, including new spillway.
  • Additionally, in January 2007, SAFCA proposing $18.11 million assessment in additional funding for flood control projects.
2006 Bond funding
Funding Category Prop. 1E Prop. 80
- state-Federal Project Levees, Weirs, Bypasses, and other Flood Management Facilitiees
- Non-Project Flood Management Facilities
- Reducing the Risks of Levee Failures in the Delta
$3 billion $500 Million
Flood Control Suloventions $500 Million $180 Million
Flood Corridors, Bypasses, and Mapping $290 Million $70 Million
Stormwater Flood Management Grants $300 Million ---
Total $4.09 billion $800 Million

 

Levee Work Completed

Main Levee Work Substantially Complete

 

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